KNOT SPRINGS COMMISSION
       
     
 Over the course of millennia, the John Day River cut a deep canyon through central Oregon to reveal dramatic columnar basalt walls. Formed when massive volcanic flows cooled, contracted and cracked, these exposed surfaces record the slow unfolding of geologic time and the forces of nature they have witnessed.  The wall was captured with high-resolution images that were printed, cut, laminated, reassembled and mounted at three-quarter scale of the original subject. This large-scale photographic sculpture both interprets the story and dimension of these raw surfaces and transmits the profound wonder of experiencing our natural world directly.
       
     
 The wall is a backdrop to the reception at  Knot Springs , a Portland social club centered around health, wellness and good times.
       
     
black.jpg
       
     
MAKING THE WALL
       
     
First Sighting
       
     
       
     
Search for Accessibility
       
     
Scramble to the River
       
     
No Trail
       
     
Capturing the Wall
       
     
Raking Light
       
     
Multiple Image Capture
       
     
Stitching the Images
       
     
Cropping and Seaming
       
     
Printing
       
     
Drawing with a Knife
       
     
KS-14.jpg
       
     
Piecing the Puzzle
       
     
Edging the Pieces
       
     
Taping
       
     
KS-19.jpg
       
     
Panel Progress
       
     
       
     
Drying the Glue
       
     
KS-23.jpg
       
     
KS-24.jpg
       
     
       
     
KS-26.jpg
       
     
KS-28.jpg
       
     
       
     
KS-1.jpg
       
     
KS-30.jpg
       
     
Vertical Tests
       
     
       
     
Glazing
       
     
       
     
 Thanks to Mattea Schwab for her invaluable assistance throughout the entire project!
       
     
KS-35.jpg
       
     
KNOT SPRINGS COMMISSION
       
     
KNOT SPRINGS COMMISSION
 Over the course of millennia, the John Day River cut a deep canyon through central Oregon to reveal dramatic columnar basalt walls. Formed when massive volcanic flows cooled, contracted and cracked, these exposed surfaces record the slow unfolding of geologic time and the forces of nature they have witnessed.  The wall was captured with high-resolution images that were printed, cut, laminated, reassembled and mounted at three-quarter scale of the original subject. This large-scale photographic sculpture both interprets the story and dimension of these raw surfaces and transmits the profound wonder of experiencing our natural world directly.
       
     

Over the course of millennia, the John Day River cut a deep canyon through central Oregon to reveal dramatic columnar basalt walls. Formed when massive volcanic flows cooled, contracted and cracked, these exposed surfaces record the slow unfolding of geologic time and the forces of nature they have witnessed.

The wall was captured with high-resolution images that were printed, cut, laminated, reassembled and mounted at three-quarter scale of the original subject. This large-scale photographic sculpture both interprets the story and dimension of these raw surfaces and transmits the profound wonder of experiencing our natural world directly.

 The wall is a backdrop to the reception at  Knot Springs , a Portland social club centered around health, wellness and good times.
       
     

The wall is a backdrop to the reception at Knot Springs, a Portland social club centered around health, wellness and good times.

black.jpg
       
     
MAKING THE WALL
       
     
MAKING THE WALL
First Sighting
       
     
First Sighting

The original scouting shots were taken midway through a 70-mile river trip on the John Day in 2015.

       
     
Locating the Wall

Using Google Earth VR, the location of the wall was found on the river which is only accessible by a 3-4 day boat trip. To obtain the necessary high resolution images, a reshoot and another access was required.

Search for Accessibility
       
     
Search for Accessibility

Using county tax maps, a nearby ranch was identified and the owner was discovered through an online search. Permission was given to drive through their 50,000-acre ranch to make a hike-in possible.

Scramble to the River
       
     
Scramble to the River

The descent started at 5:30 AM so that the raking light at 7:30 could be captured—if the clouds lifted.

No Trail
       
     
No Trail

Google Earth VR helped identify a route to the wall which was a 1.5 hour descent.

Capturing the Wall
       
     
Capturing the Wall

Six different captures were obtained from different locations across the river.

Raking Light
       
     
Raking Light

The clouds lifted when the sun raked across the columns to accentuate the relief of the formations.

Multiple Image Capture
       
     
Multiple Image Capture

To obtain the amount of pixels needed for the large-scale print, many high-resolution images were taken with a panoramic head to increment the shots.

Stitching the Images
       
     
Stitching the Images

42 images were captured and stitched together to obtain make one high-resolution file.

Cropping and Seaming
       
     
Cropping and Seaming

The crop was selected and the seams were determined for printing.

Printing
       
     
Printing

Pushdot Studio printed 5 separate files on 44”-wide rolls of photo rag paper.

Drawing with a Knife
       
     
Drawing with a Knife

The prints were cut apart into thousands of pieces along the lines of the formations, fractures and facets of the wall.

KS-14.jpg
       
     
Piecing the Puzzle
       
     
Piecing the Puzzle

As each piece was cut it was placed into position on another table.

Edging the Pieces
       
     
Edging the Pieces

Every edge of each piece was darkened to minimize paper-white outlines between the pieces in the final assemblage.

Taping
       
     
Taping

All the pieces were reassembled with archival mending tape.

KS-19.jpg
       
     
Panel Progress
       
     
Panel Progress

Each panel was worked on independently throughout the process.

       
     
Gluing

Hot rabbit skin glue was applied to the surface of each panel.

Drying the Glue
       
     
Drying the Glue

When the wet surfaces were dried, each piece curled to accentuate the topography of the imagery.

KS-23.jpg
       
     
KS-24.jpg
       
     
       
     
Grouting the Seams

To reinforce the seams and preserve the relief of the surface, matte medium was applied to every seam on the reverse side.

KS-26.jpg
       
     
KS-28.jpg
       
     
       
     
Laminating the Surface

Japanese gampi paper was adhered to the surface of each panel with rabbit skin glue.

KS-1.jpg
       
     
KS-30.jpg
       
     
Vertical Tests
       
     
Vertical Tests

Three of the panels were hung in the only part of the studio they could be. This was the only time that the work could be seen in its final orientation until the install.

       
     
Joining the Panels

Each of the five panels was assembled into one roll.

Glazing
       
     
Glazing

Thin layers of paint and stain were glazed onto the surface as the work was unrolled.

       
     
Hanging

The wall was hoisted via pulleys and mounted with a french cleat.

 Thanks to Mattea Schwab for her invaluable assistance throughout the entire project!
       
     

Thanks to Mattea Schwab for her invaluable assistance throughout the entire project!

KS-35.jpg